Woman Who Suffered With Anorexia Shares Recovery Pictures To Inspire Others

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A woman who came scarily close to death when her weight plummeted to below five stone now shares pictures of her ‘tummy rolls and cellulite’, to inspire other women to love their bodies like she does.

Megan Jayne, 22, who weighed just 4st 6lbs (28 kg) at her worst, has banished the scales and instead promotes body positivity and self-love on Instagram.

Megan first suffered from body image issues when she was five, and only just starting at school. By the time she was 14, her ‘all-consuming demons’ were officially diagnosed as Anorexia Nervosa. She said, ‘At my lowest weight size four clothes were falling off me, my hair thinned and I was constantly freezing cold.’

She now works as carer and lives with her boyfriend in Essex, but in her teenage years she spent a summer in a youth psychiatric institution before being hospitalised – where doctors told her she had just weeks to live and prescribed tube feeding and lots of bed rest.

After two years of slow recovery aided by the unwavering support of her father, she had an epiphany aged 16.

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She said: ‘Anger overwhelmed me – pure, unadulterated anger that this vicious disease had stolen so much of my life from me.’

She started eating an unhealthy amount, and within a year had nearly tripled her body weight. However, she had replaced starvation with binging and was still not finding happiness. 

After another five years of crash dieting, she finally found herself on the other side of the disease and began loving her body and preaching body positivity. She began to post pictures of her ‘thunder thighs’ on social media and her own website, gaining almost 40,000 fans.

Now, she wants to teach the world that body positivity ‘has the power to save lives’, and has made it her mission to inspire confidence in as many other women as she can.

Writing on her website she said:

‘When I look in the mirror I see belly rolls, I see cellulite, I see a million flaws that have previously sent me spiralling into self hatred. But this time, I also see happiness. I see beauty, beyond the one dimensional photoshopped form we’re taught to aspire to. I see worth, that extends far past the physical. My vision is no longer clouded by the “not good enough” mentality we’ve all been taught about ourselves.’





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